Recovery Act

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also known as the stimulus package, makes money available to universities to promote research in many areas while meeting the act's goal of saving or creating 3.5 million jobs. This Web site from the Office of the Vice President for Research will help researchers get the latest information they need in order to work with the recovery act.

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funding

The University of Texas at Austin has received $129 million for research through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Research investment includes major pieces of instrumentation, investigations in health, energy, infrastructure and other areas, and expanding supercomputing capabilties.

View the funding totals for each unit and the funding totals by individual (PDF, download Adobe Reader).

Resources and Information

Where to Monitor Recovery Act Money

The University of Texas at Austin diligently reports all Recovery Act funding and expenditures. Reports are available that allow the public to track federal stimulus money in summary form, or by State Agency (recipient) or by Federal Agency (grantor).

Visit Texas Recovery: Stimulus Tracking for these reports. Report suspected fraud, waste or abuse associated with Recovery Act funds.

ARRA State Stabilization Funds

View PDF documents of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stabilization-government service funds appropriated by the Texas Legislature for The University of Texas at Austin. Download Adobe Reader.

ScienceWorksForUS

ScienceWorksForUS, sponsored by several associations of universities, shows how the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) is fueling research, recovery and reinvestment activities across the country.

University Bid Opportunities

Including bid opportunities funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

News

Pharmacy Researcher Receives $841,000 Challenge Grant
From National Institutes of Health for Neuroendocrine Study

Dr. Andrea Gore, professor of pharmacy at The University of Texas at Austin, has received a two-year, $841,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the transgenerational effects of environmental contaminants on neurological and reproductive development.

Better Drugs to Fight Flu is Goal of $1.5 Million NIH Project
At University of Texas at Austin, Rice University

University of Texas at Austin and Rice University scientists have won a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to scrutinize the influenza A virus for clues that could lead to more effective antiviral drugs.

Resiliency Among People Who Work with Child Abuse Victims
Subject of New $500,000 University of Texas at Austin Study

The Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (IDVSA) at The University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work has received a $500,000 federal grant to create a program to build resiliency among staff and volunteers who work with child abuse victims.

National Science Foundation Awards $7 Million to TACC
For Remote Visualization and Data Analysis

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a $7 million grant to the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin for a three-year project that will provide a new computing resource and the largest, most comprehensive suite of visualization and data analysis (VDA) services to the open science community.

The University of Texas at Austin Receives $1 Million Grant
To Build Carbon Capture and Storage Workforce

The University of Texas at Austin will use a $994,702 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to help create a skilled workforce for the emerging carbon capture and storage industry and to build public awareness of the technology's benefits to society.

Solar Cells, Batteries and Geological Storage Research
Receive $30.5 Million at The University of Texas at Austin

With two $15 million grants, scientists and engineers aim to revolutionize solar cells and provide the fundamental science for geological storage of greenhouse gases as part of two Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) established at The University of Texas at Austin by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Research Highlights

A sampling of University of Texas at Austin projects funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Project: Enabling Transformational Science and Engineering Through Integrated Collaborative Visualization and Data Analysis for the National User Community
Researchers: Kelly Gaither, principal investigator, Texas Advanced Computing Center
Amount: $7,000,000

This award will, for the first time, provide a comprehensive suite of large-scale visualization and data analysis services to the open science community. By leveraging existing tools and techniques, integrating state-of-the-art research products, and providing exceptional user support, we will deploy a national, general-purpose visualization and data analysis discovery environment

Project: Development of a Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Nanomagnetism Studies
Researchers: Alex de Lozanne, principal investigator, Department of Physics; and co-principal investigators, John Goodenough, Department of Chemical Engineering, Allan MacDonald, Chih-Kang Shih and Maxim Tsoi, Department of Physics.
Amount: $483,000

The researchers propose to to build a new generation of spin-sensitive microscopes that can make this powerful technique more widely available in the United States, where this type of equipment is scarce. The team that will work on this is unusually diverse, because half of the doctoral students are female and more than half of the team is Hispanic. During the summer the team also has a few high school students, with strong emphasis on the participation of young women.

Project: Marriage in Context: External Factors and Relationship Maintenance
Researcher: Lisa Neff, principal investigator, assistant professor, School of Human Ecology
Amount: $599,680

This project aims to shed light on the life events that may inhibit successful relationship functioning. Understanding the dynamics and contexts that account for successful marital outcomes should, in turn, have a broader impact on society by helping to inform practices that help the marital unit, and direct resources toward practices most likely to be effective in strengthening families.

News from Agencies

Agencies and their mandates for distributing funds under the Act.